Covid-19 Vaccination FAQs

Your Questions Answered

Useful Information about vaccinations in Cheshire and Merseyside

Last updated 20.01.21

Now that more doses of Covid-19 vaccines are available, the NHS is able to open more vaccination services including large Vaccination Centres and, in the near future, pharmacies.

In Cheshire and Merseyside currently there are:

  • 20 hospital sites in operation with capacity for 29,000 vaccinations per week
  • 47 sites in primary care locations with an expected capacity for 74,000 vaccinations per week
  • There is one mass vaccination site opening in St Helens with the capacity to deliver over 7,000 vaccinations per week.
  • Community pharmacy locations are increasing with two live now; two planned for next week and a further site for the week commencing 25th January. These will provide a combined capacity of 16,000 per week across Cheshire and Merseyside. Further sites are being planned.

How It Works

People who are eligible, live near these new vaccination services and who haven’t already been vaccinated by their local GP led vaccination services or hospital hub, will receive letters from the NHS Covid-19 Vaccination Booking Service, telling them how they can book their appointment.

The NHS is rolling out additional services quickly, but it remains important that people don’t try to book or go to these services before they receive their booking letter.

If you receive a letter from the national NHS Covid-19 Vaccination Booking Service and you book an appointment, please make sure you attend it. The sooner you get your vaccination, when eligible, the earlier you will be protected from Covid-19.

Vaccination centres offer an important additional option for people who are eligible, and we expect more sites to be available in the coming days and weeks.

Please don’t delay having your vaccine, but if you can’t travel to a vaccination centre or you would rather wait for an appointment closer to home, you can choose to do that, and your local GP-led service will be in touch soon to offer an alternative.

Like the rest of the NHS we are working to offer vaccines to everyone in the top priority groups by the middle of February.

Please do not contact the NHS if you haven’t received an invite yet. We are very busy at the moment and doing so could prevent a patient who needs our help from getting through. We will contact you when it is the right time for you to book your appointment.


Where can I get vaccinated?

The NHS are delivering the vaccine in three main ways:

  • Hospital hubs – NHS hospitals vaccinating on site
  • Local vaccine services – community or primary care led services. Groups of GPs are working together called Primary Care Networks (PCNs) and Community pharmacies. Usually based in primary care facilities, retail, community facilities, temporary structures or roving teams
  • Mass vaccination centres – large sites such as sports and conference venues set up for high volumes of people

When you are eligible to be vaccination you will be contacted by your GP Practice to attend one of their local vaccination centres. This may not be at your usual GP Practice.

In addition to GP led services, people may also be contacted by a local hospital hub either to have the vaccine as an inpatient or at an outpatient appointment. Hospital hubs are also vaccinating frontline health and care workers.

You may get a letter from the NHS COVID-19 vaccination booking service inviting you to book online or by phone. Booking through this service will give you the option of having the vaccine at a mass vaccination centre, or a community pharmacy depending on whether these are available locally.

St Helens Rugby League Ground, the Totally Wicked Stadium, is the site of the first large-scale COVID-19 Vaccination Centre in Cheshire and Merseyside.

The venue is an additional option for the people of Cheshire and Merseyside to choose when they are contacted to have their vaccine, alongside primary care and local pharmacy venues.

Vaccination will be by appointment only and members of the public are asked not to turn up at their GP, hospital, pharmacy or mass vaccination centre unless they have been contacted by the NHS. Those in the Government’s priority groups will be contacted first and given the option of the St Helens venue.


What difference will the vaccine make?

Vaccination is the most important thing we can do to protect ourselves and our children against ill-health. They prevent up to 3 million deaths worldwide every year.

Since vaccines were introduced in the UK, diseases like smallpox, polio and tetanus that used to kill or disable millions of people are either gone or seen very rarely.

Other diseases like measles and diphtheria have been reduced by up to 99.9% since their vaccines were introduced.

However, if people stop having vaccines, it’s possible for infectious diseases to quickly spread again.


How does the vaccine work?

The vaccine works by making a protein from the virus that is important for creating protection.

The protein works in the same way they do for other vaccines by stimulating the immune system to make antibodies and cells to fight the infection.


What’s in the vaccine?

A detailed review of the vaccines and their ingredients have been provided by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and can be found here:

For the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine information is available here

For the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine information is available here

The British Islamic Medical Association have produced a helpful guide for the Muslim community which can be found here


Who is getting the vaccine?

The Joint Committee for Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) published its final advice on 30 December which can be found here.

In line with this guidance, in this initial phase vaccines will be prioritised for those 80 years of age and over, those who live and work in care home, and frontline health and social care staff.

Our ambition, if supplies allow, is to have offered vaccines to the most vulnerable 13 million people by the middle of February.


I live with someone in a priority group – will I get vaccinated too?

The current prioritisation plan does not include household members of NHS staff or clinically vulnerable people automatically – although in some cases family members may be eligible in their own right.


Getting Your Vaccination

Why haven’t I been invited for a vaccination?

The NHS is prioritising vaccinating those people who experts have agreed will benefit from it the most. You will be contacted when it is your turn to book your vaccination.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI)  has advised that the first priorities for any Covid-19 vaccination programme should be to minimise Covid-19 deaths and the protection of health and social care staff and systems. Current evidence strongly indicates that the single greatest risk of death from Covid-19 is increasing age and that the risk increases exponentially with age. With this in mind, the rollout to patients is based on age:

  • those aged over 80 years
  • those aged over 75 years
  • those aged over 70 years
  • adults on the NHS shielded patient list
  • those aged over 65 years
  • adults under 65 years with long term conditions.

The rollout of the vaccination is accelerating, and we expect the vaccine will be available to more people early in 2021.

The public, and particularly our patient representatives, have an important part to play to help the NHS roll out the vaccination:

  • please don’t contact the NHS to seek a vaccine, we will contact you;
  • when we do contact you, please attend your booked appointments; at exactly the time you’re asked to, so that we can avoid queues in this cold weather;
  • please continue to follow all the guidance to control the virus and save lives.

In the meantime, you can get information about the Covid-19 vaccination online at: nhs.uk/covidvaccination.


 When will I get my vaccine?

We understand people are keen to know when they will receive their vaccination and we are asking for their support and patience as we deliver the biggest vaccination programme the NHS has undertaken.

When it is the right time people will be contacted to make their appointments. For most people they will receive a letter either from their GP or the national booking system; this will include all the information they need, including their NHS number. Some services are currently also phoning and texting patients to invite them in.

We know lots of people will be eager to get protected but we would ask people not to contact the NHS to get an appointment until they are contacted.  The NHS is working hard to make sure those at greatest risk are offered the vaccine first.

Everyone will be called by letter or by phone when it is their time to be vaccinated. The NHS has a clear vaccine delivery plan and it will take some time for GP practices to work through the number of people aged over 80 that need to be contacted. Please don’t worry if you or a family member is aged over 80 but hasn’t heard anything so far.

We are reminding everyone to be patient and play their part by following these steps:

  • Do not contact your GP practice or the NHS to seek a vaccine, we will contact you
  • When we do contact you, please attend your booked appointments
  • Please continue to follow all the guidance to control the virus and save lives by socially distancing, wearing a mask or face covering and washing your hands regularly

When you book your first dose you will also be asked to book your second too. For most people this will be within three months of your first dose. The UK Chief Medical Officers have agreed this longer timeframe so that more people can get their first dose quickly and because the evidence shows that one dose offers a high level of protection. Getting both doses remains important so we would urge people to return for it at the right time.


Where is my nearest mass vaccination centre?

Mass vaccination centres have started to open to vaccinate people who live within a 45mile radius who can’t get to a local vaccination centre. St Helens Rugby League Ground, the Totally Wicked Stadium, is the first large-scale COVID-19 Vaccination Centre in Cheshire and Merseyside.

Led by St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, the centre opened on Monday 18th January using the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

The venue is an additional option for the people of Cheshire and Merseyside to choose when they are contacted to have their vaccine, alongside primary care and local pharmacy venues.

Some priority residents have received a letter giving them the option to have their vaccination at the site via the national booking service.

We understand some people will not be able to travel to a mass vaccination centre or would prefer to have their vaccination more locally. So, if you receive a letter and you do not want to go to St Helens – you do not need to take any action, your GP practice will still contact you automatically as it works through its list of priority patients and you will not be missed.


Can I turn up at a mass Vaccination Centres?

No. People will be offered vaccinations in line with recommendations from the independent Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). The NHS will contact people when it is their turn. People will need an appointment to get their vaccine; most people will be invited by letter from their GP practice or the national programme.


How did you decide where the vaccination centres would be?

The NHS local and regionally proposed sites based on a combination of geographical alignment to local health systems to ensure coverage, and the likelihood of the sites being ready in a timely fashion. In some cases, selections were made on population density within the region, and in other cases there was a consideration given to the number of existing vaccination services currently open and expected to open shortly in that area. This delivers a fair and equitable distribution of sites across the country.


I can’t get to my GP or mass vaccination centre – how will you help me?

People who are housebound will be contacted by their GP services about alternative ways to get vaccinated. People can also wait until more locations closer to where they live become available. The NHS will follow up with people that haven’t booked their appointment, as a reminder.


How can I book an appointment?

If you receive a letter from the national NHS Covid-19 Vaccination Booking Service and you book an appointment, please make sure you attend it. The sooner you get your vaccination, when eligible, the earlier you will be protected from Covid-19 you can book an appointment in the following ways:

Online

To book your vaccination, visit: https://www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccination.

You will need to provide your name, date of birth, postcode and ideally your NHS number, which will be included on your booking letter.

If you have lost your letter or don’t have your NHS number, you may need to provide the name and postcode/postcode of the GP practice you are registered with – in this circumstance you should use the phone booking service.

By telephone

If you cannot use the NHS website, phone 119 free of charge. You can ask someone else to do this for you if you prefer. At times, the phone line might get very busy and this may mean waiting to speak to someone.


Choices About the Vaccine

Can I choose which vaccine to have?

No. Any vaccines that the NHS will provide will have been approved because they pass the MHRA’s tests on safety and efficacy, so people should be assured that whatever vaccine they get, it is worth their while.


Which vaccine will I get?

Both the Pfizer/BioNTech and Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines are now available. Both vaccines have been shown to be safe and offer high levels of protection and have been given regulatory approval by the MHRA.

The Government has in principle secured access to seven different vaccine candidates, across four different vaccine types, totalling over 357 million doses. This includes:

40 million doses of the BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine

100m doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

17 million doses of the Moderna vaccine, which has been approved by the MHRA but is not expected to be delivered to the NHS until Spring.


Can I pay to be vaccinated privately?

No. Vaccinations are only available through the NHS. You can be contacted by the NHS, your employer, or a GP surgery local to you, to receive your vaccine. Remember, the vaccine is free of charge.

  • The NHS will never ask you for your bank account or card details.
  • The NHS will never ask you for your PIN or banking password.
  • The NHS will never arrive unannounced at your home to administer the vaccine.
  • The NHS will never ask you to prove your identity by sending copies of personal documents such as your passport, driving licence, bills or pay slips.

If you receive a call you believe to be fraudulent, hang up. If you believe you have been the victim of fraud or identity theft you should report this directly to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040. Where the victim is vulnerable, and particularly if you are worried that someone has or might come to your house, report it to the Police online or by calling 101.


Vaccine Safety

Is the vaccine safe?

Yes. The NHS will not offer any Covid-19 vaccinations to the public until independent experts have signed off that it is safe to do so.

The MHRA, the official UK regulator, have said that both of these vaccines have good safety profiles and offer a high level of protection, and we have full confidence in their expert judgement and processes.

As with any medicine, vaccines are highly regulated products.

There are checks at every stage in the development and manufacturing process, and continued monitoring once it has been authorised and is being used in the wider population.

The MHRA recommend that those with severe allergies to the ingredients of the vaccines should not receive them.


Does the vaccine cause side effects?

These are important details that the MHRA always considers when assessing candidate vaccines for use.

For this vaccine, like lots of others, they have identified that some people might feel slightly unwell, but they report that no significant side effects have been observed in the more than 43,000 people involved in trials.

All patients will be provided with information on the vaccine they have received, how to look out for any side effects, and what to do if they do occur, including reporting them to the MHRA.

More information on possible side effects can be found here.


The vaccine was developed very quickly – is it safe?

The global crisis that is Covid 19 has meant that we have been able to recruit patients to be involved in testing the vaccine much more quickly than would normally be the case.

Scientists had already been working on vaccines against the SARS group of viruses, of which Covid-19 is just one, for many years, so we were not starting from nothing

The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine that has been approved for use in the UK has met very strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness set out by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

None of the other vaccines under development will be available to the NHS until they have passed those same strict standards, which apply to every vaccine the NHS uses.

So far, thousands of people have been given a Covid-19 vaccine and reports of serious side effects like allergic reactions have been very rare.

You should not have the vaccine if you’ve ever had a serious allergic reaction to medicines, vaccines or food.


How long will the vaccine protect me for?

We expect these vaccines to work for at least a year – if not longer. This will be constantly monitored.


I am pregnant – should I get vaccinated?

The Covid-19 vaccination is not recommended for women who are pregnant.

Government guidelines recommend that vaccination in pregnancy should only be considered where the risk of exposure is high and cannot be avoided, or if you have underlying conditions that put you at very high risk of serious complications of COVID-19 which may prevent you from receiving your vaccination until after your pregnancy is delivered. In these circumstances, clinicians should discuss the risks and benefits of vaccination with you and tell you about the absence of safety data for the vaccine in pregnancy.

Although there is currently no safety data available for COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy, there is no known risk from other non-live vaccines in pregnancy. Although the available data do not indicate any harm to pregnancy, there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine use of COVID-19 vaccines during pregnancy.

Click here for further information


Can I have the vaccination if I am planning to get pregnant or having fertility treatment?

The JCVI does not advise routine pregnancy testing before receipt of a COVID-19 vaccine and they state that those who are trying to become pregnant do not need to avoid pregnancy after vaccination. It is expected that access to the vaccine will allow vulnerable patient groups to be able to access fertility treatment that may have been paused during the pandemic.

The use of any pharmaceutical product in women who are trying to conceive should be subject to a balance between the expected benefit and potential harms. Women who would benefit from the vaccine should be able to receive it without compromising their planned fertility treatment. Women should be made aware that although there is no safety data for COVID-19 vaccinations in pregnancy, there is no known risk from other non-live vaccines in pregnant women. In line with the JCVI guidance, appropriately informed patients who choose to accept COVID-19 vaccination do not need to avoid fertility treatment/pregnancy after vaccination.

The Association of Reproductive and Clinical Scientists (ARCS) and British Fertility Society (BFS) have released a statement regarding the COVID-19 vaccination for those planning fertility treatment. Please see their full statement here: https://www.arcscientists.org/arcs-bfs-joint-guidelines-addendum/


Can I have the COVID vaccination if I am planning to get pregnant or having fertility treatment?

The JCVI does not advise routine pregnancy testing before receipt of a COVID-19 vaccine and they state that those who are trying to become pregnant do not need to avoid pregnancy after vaccination. It is expected that access to the vaccine will allow vulnerable patient groups to be able to access fertility treatment that may have been paused during the pandemic.

The use of any pharmaceutical product in women who are trying to conceive should be subject to a balance between the expected benefit and potential harms. Women who would benefit from the vaccine should be able to receive it without compromising their planned fertility treatment. Women should be made aware that although there is no safety data for COVID-19 vaccinations in pregnancy, there is no known risk from other non-live vaccines in pregnant women. In line with the JCVI guidance, appropriately informed patients who choose to accept COVID-19 vaccination do not need to avoid fertility treatment/pregnancy after vaccination.

The Association of Reproductive and Clinical Scientists (ARCS) and British Fertility Society (BFS) have released a statement regarding the COVID-19 vaccination for those planning fertility treatment. Please see their full statement here:

https://www.arcscientists.org/arcs-bfs-joint-guidelines-addendum/


I take immune suppressants – should I get vaccinated?

Although the vaccine was not tested on those with very serious immunological conditions, the vaccine has been proven to be very effective and it is unlikely that the vaccine will have no effect at all on these individuals.

There may be a very small number of people with very complex or severe immunological problems who can’t make any response at all – but the vaccine should not do any harm to these individuals. Individuals meeting these criteria may want to discuss the vaccine further with their specialist doctor.

People with history of a severe allergy to the ingredients of the vaccines should not be vaccinated.

The MHRA have updated their guidance to say that pregnant women and those who are breastfeeding can have the vaccine but should discuss it with a clinician to ensure that the benefits outweigh any potential risks.


Are the Vaccine Centres safe?

All of the vaccination centres have gone through a registration to make sure that they meet the guidance and safety requirements. There will be safe distancing, hand sanitising and face masks at all of the centres.


After You Have Had a Vaccine

Am I protected as soon as I have been vaccinated?

You are required to have two doses of the Covid-19 vaccine, 12 weeks apart. You may not be protected until at least seven days after your second dose of vaccine.


Will the vaccine protect me against the new strain of the virus?

There is no evidence currently that the new strain will be resistant to the vaccine we have, so we are continuing to vaccinate people as normal. Scientists are looking now in detail at the characteristics of the virus in relation to the vaccine. Viruses, such as the winter flu virus, often branch into different strains but these small variations rarely render vaccines ineffective.


I’ve been vaccinated – can I go about life as normal now?

No. Both vaccines have been authorised on the basis of two doses because the evidence from the clinical trials shows that this gives the maximum level of protection.

No vaccine is completely effective and it will take a few weeks for your body to build up protection, two doses will reduce your chance of becoming seriously ill.

It is important that anyone who has had the vaccine continues to follow government guidance on social distancing and wearing a mask as well as the additional measures in place where they live.


How Long Should I wait for my second vaccine?

To ensure as many people are vaccinated as quickly as possible, the Department for Health and Social Care now advise that the second dose of both the Oxford/AstraZeneca and the Pfizer/BioNtech vaccine should be scheduled up to 12 weeks apart.


Do I have to have the second vaccine?

The evidence doesn’t show any risk to not having the second dose other than not being as protected as you otherwise would be. We urge everyone to show up for both of their appointments for their own protection as well as to ensure we don’t waste vaccines or the time of NHS staff.


Should I go back to work now that I have been vaccinated?

Yes, you should be able to work as long as you feel well. If your arm is particularly sore, you may find heavy lifting difficult. If you feel unwell or very tired you should rest and avoid operating machinery or driving.

The vaccine cannot give you Covid-19 infection and two doses will reduce your chance of becoming seriously ill. However, you will need to continue to follow the guidance in your workplace, including wearing the correct personal protection equipment and taking part in any screening programmes.


Black, Asian and Minority Ethnicity

I am BAME – will I get priority?

There is clear evidence that certain Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) groups have higher rates of infection, and higher rates of serious disease and mortality. The reasons are multiple and complex.

There is no strong evidence that ethnicity by itself (or genetics) is the sole explanation for observed differences in rates of severe illness and deaths. What is clear is that certain health conditions are associated with increased risk of serious disease, and these health conditions are often overrepresented in certain Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups.

Prioritisation of people with underlying health conditions will also provide for greater vaccination of BAME communities who are disproportionately affected by such health conditions.

Tailored local implementation to promote good vaccine coverage in Black, Asian and minority ethnic groups will be the most important factor within a vaccine programme in reducing health inequalities in these groups.

The NHS will provide advice and information at every possible opportunity, including working closely with BAME communities, to support those receiving a vaccine and to anyone who has questions about the vaccination process.

Throughout the pandemic increasing attention has been given to reducing health inequalities and we have invested more than £4 million into research into Covid-19 and ethnic disparities so that we can go further.

We understand that some communities have specific concerns and may be more hesitant in taking the vaccine than others. The NHS is working collaboratively with partners to ensure vaccine messages reaches as diverse an audience as possible and are tailored to meet their needs.

This includes engagement with community and faith-led groups, charities and other voluntary organisations.


Was the vaccine tested on BAME people?

The phase three study of the Pfizer BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine demonstrated a vaccine efficacy of 95%, with consistent efficacy across age, gender and ethnicity. For the Pfizer trial, participants included 9.6% black/African, 26.1% Hispanic/Latino and 3.4% Asian.


If you have already had Covid-19

I have Covid-19 now, can I get vaccinated?

People currently unwell and experiencing Covid-19 symptoms should not receive the Covid-19 vaccine until they have recovered.


I’ve already had Covid-19 – should I get vaccinated?

Yes, they should get vaccinated. There is no evidence of any safety concerns from vaccinating individuals with a history of Covid-19 infection, or with detectable Covid-19 antibodies, so people who have had Covid-19 disease (whether confirmed or suspected) can still receive the vaccine when it is their time to do so.


I have ‘long Covid’ do I still need a vaccine?

Yes, if they are in a priority group identified by JCVI. The MHRA have looked at this and decided that getting vaccinated is just as important for those who have already had Covid-19 as it is for those who haven’t, including those who have mild residual symptoms. Where people are suffering significant ongoing complications from Covid they should discuss whether or not to have a vaccine now with a clinician.


I have booked my flu jab – should I get the Covid vacc at the same time?

It is not essential to leave time between the flu and Covid vaccine but it is recommended that there should be a gap of a week.

We would always encourage anyone who is eligible but not yet taken up their flu jab to do so as soon as possible.


Supporting the Rollout

How do I volunteer with the vaccination programme?

We have launched a new volunteer scheme, calling on residents to support our practices in the delivery of the vaccination programme.

More details about the national volunteer programme can be found here or see your local Clinical Commissioning Group website for more details.


Rumours and Myths

Why are second doses being postponed?

The UK Chief Medical Officers have agreed a longer timeframe between first and second doses so that more people can get their first dose quickly, and because the evidence shows that one dose still offers a high level of protection after two weeks – 89% for the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine and 74% for the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

This decision will allow us to get the maximum benefit for the most people in the shortest possible time and will help save lives.


Will vaccines be wasted?

Our plans are based around ensuring that waste is minimised. For example, this includes clustering vaccinations in one GP practice or high volume sites, and ensuring that the numbers of people each facility is able to see in one week is in line with the stock they receive. Sometimes, people may be contacted at short notice to attend for a vaccine to avoid wastage.


Will vaccines still be provided/can I still attend my appointment during the national lockdown?

Yes. Getting the COVID-19 vaccine, or any other vaccine, is an important medical appointment and so is within the rules wherever you live. Vaccinations will continue as normal in all areas through the national lockdown and beyond. If you have booked or are offered an appointment, please attend it.

The place that you choose to have your vaccine will keep you safe from COVID-19 through a range of measures including cleaning and disinfecting and having social distancing in waiting areas. Please also wear a face covering to your appointment. You should also take the usual steps to minimise your risk as you travel to your appointment.


I’ve heard that the vaccine causes allergic reactions – is this true?

These vaccines are safe and effective for the vast majority of people – they have been tested on tens of thousands of people and assessed by experts.

Any person with a history of immediate-onset anaphylaxis to a vaccine, medicine or food should not receive the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. A second dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine should not be given to those who have experienced anaphylaxis to the first dose of Pfizer/BioNTech vaccination.

Everybody will also be screened for potential allergic reactions before getting vaccinated. All vaccinators will have the training they need to deal with any rare cases of adverse reactions, and all venues will be equipped to care for people who need it – just like with any other vaccine.


I’ve read that the vaccine will alter my genes is this true?

There is no evidence to suggest that individual genetic material will undergo an alteration after receiving the vaccine.


I have heard that the vaccine causes infertility – is this true?

There is no evidence to suggest that the vaccine causes infertility.


I’m a vegan/vegetarian – are there any animal products in the vaccine?

The vaccine does not contain any animal products or egg.

If, and when, further vaccines are approved we will publish information about known allergens or ingredients that are important for certain faiths, cultures and beliefs.


How do you decide which vaccine to use?

The vaccines that the NHS uses and in what circumstances will be decided by the MHRA. Both vaccines are classed as being very effective. The Oxford/AstraZeneca is easier to store and transport, meaning we can deliver them in more places, and we expect to have more doses available as they are manufactured in the UK, so we would expect that most people are likely to receive this vaccine over the coming weeks and months.


How do I find out how many vaccines have been done so far?

Data will be provided centrally by NHSE/I to give a full picture of the programme.


I have been called/texted about getting a vaccine – is it a fraud?

We are aware some people are receiving suspicious calls and text messages offering the COVID-19 vaccination, so we are reminding residents:

  • The vaccine is only available on the NHS for free to people in priority groups, and the NHS will contact you when it is your turn. Anyone offering a paid-for vaccine is committing a crime.
  • The NHS will never ask you to press a button on your keypad or send a text to confirm you want the vaccine, and never ask for payment or for your bank details.
  • At the moment we are also not making house calls to deliver or discuss the vaccine. Anyone offering this now is committing a crime.

If people receive a call they believe to be fraudulent, they should hang up. If they believe they have been the victim of fraud or identity theft they should report this directly to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040. Where the victim is vulnerable, and particularly if they are worried that someone has or might come to their house, they should report it to the Police online or by calling 101.

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